Our Work

Rework the Bay Aims to Advance Collective Solutions That Increase:

1: The Number of Quality, Empowered Jobs in our Region with Pay and Say

Pay

Compensation that goes beyond meeting basic needs to enable economic security, including family-sustaining wages, health care, paid sick leave, paid family leave and the opportunity to put money aside for unexpected challenges and retirement.

Say

People having agency over what happens at work and how they work, not just what they get from working. It ensures that work is stable, offers dignity and predictable work schedules, and is healthy and safe.

2: Equitable access to those jobs

This includes the ability to locate and apply for quality jobs, access to the skills and education needed to compete for those jobs, freedom from discrimination in hiring and advancement, and inclusive company cultures.

3: Affordable, Accessible support systems

Expanding availability of support systems, which are necessary for people to keep their jobs and stay in the region, include transportation, child care, food security and stable housing.

We bring together leaders in economic justice, education and training, business, and philanthropy to advance collective solutions for a diverse and equitable Bay Area. This work takes two primary forms:

Re-Imagining a Bay Area Workforce System Grounded in Racial and Gender Equity

Using both qualitative and quantitative research, Insight Center for Community Economic Development examined historical policies, practices, and narratives that drive racial and gender inequity in Bay Area workforce systems.

Understanding and Responding to the Changing Nature of Work in the Bay Area

Working Partnerships USA and Jobs with Justice SF collaborated to provide a landscape scan of emerging initiatives, key players, and research of the changing nature of work. In addition, this project includes a unique framework to guide stakeholders on identifying key issues, gaps and pathways towards solutions.

Project Signal

This Bay Area education and workforce data transparency pilot unlocks existing data to enable low-income Bay Area residents to access personalized education and employment pathways to quality, secure and family-sustaining jobs.

Bay Area Workforce Equity Indicators Project

Our Equity at Work Council is partnering with PolicyLink and the National Fund for Workforce Solutions to develop a set of data indicators that illustrate racial equity gaps in our region’s workforce. The Bay Area is one of 10 regions nationally collaborating on this JP Morgan Chase supported project. The initial workforce equity indicator report is due out in Fall 2020.

Bay Area Undocumented Cash Relief Network

ReWork the Bay, in partnership with the San Francisco Foundation and the Grove Foundation, is leading a collaborative nine-county effort to increase coordination and collaboration among existing relief funds serving undocumented community members, identifying and filling gaps where cash relief access does not exist, and building the capacity of all funds to ensure maximum efficiency and security in distributing relief.

On-Demand and On-Edge: Ride Hailing and Delivery Workers in SF

The San Francisco Local Agency Formation Commission (SF LAFCo) partnered with Jobs With Justice SF, Jobs With Justice Education Fund, UC Santa Cruz and Driver’s Seat Cooperative on a large survey of transit-oriented gig workers in San Francisco to better understand labor practices and the impact on public systems of large gig companies such as Uber, Lyft, Postmates and DoorDash.

For more information about any of these systems change projects contact Rob Hope.

 

ReWork the Bay supports funder learning and collaboration, including:

Peer Learning Sessions [funder members only]:

  • Two peer learning sessions annually for funder members to share information about their strategy and seek thought partnership from their peers. These sessions provide an intimate, supportive space to grapple with hard questions among values-aligned funders, and may feature guest speakers who can offer expertise on issues of interest to funder members.
  • 2020 Peer Learning Session topics:
  • Second Quarter: Exploring Grantee-Friendly Practices with The Whitman Institute on Trust-Based Philanthropy
  • Fourth Quarter: Reflecting on 2020, looking forward to 2021: An opportunity for members to reflect and share accomplishments from 2020 and discuss plans/hopes for 2021.

Racial Equity Learning Community [complimentary for funder members, fee for non-members]

Our year-long Racial Equity Learning Community provides both professional development content and the opportunity to build deeper relationships with peer grantmakers.

“The training took us on a path of looking at root causes – redlining, and other discrimination policies that led to the Bay Area of today. It’s always good to remind ourselves that we’re not in a vacuum and that this didn’t happen overnight but has been a process over several generations.” – Luis Arteaga of the Y&H Soda Foundation, and a member of ReWork the Bay

Launching in Fall 2020, this year’s Racial Equity Learning Community will: (1) deepen authentic relationships among learning community members; (2) grow the community of philanthropic professionals doing racial justice work in our sector and region; (3) continue to build our individual and collective capacity to apply a racial justice lens to economic mobility grantmaking strategy; (4) provide thought partnership and a support system for those leading/ participating in racial equity efforts within their foundations.

Funder Briefings [open to funder members and non-members]

We offer funder briefings to share insights from research and pilot projects supported by ReWork the Bay. These briefings also provide direct investment opportunities for funders to support the work of our partners, bring new information and perspectives to the workforce field, and build funder relationships across the workforce and worker justice ecosystems.

The Equity at Work Council (EWC) is a 15-member body that leads ReWork the Bay’s programmatic strategy, generates policy and systems change recommendations and models deep cross-sector collaboration. EWC represents five priority stakeholder groups:

  • Economic justice organizations;
  • Community-based workforce development providers;
  • Workforce Development Board system leaders;
  • Community College system leaders; and
  • Employers.

See who is part of the Council.

Sign up for our email list to receive information about future funder learning and collaboration opportunities.

Looking Ahead

Looking Ahead

An inclusive Bay Area starts with an inclusive recovery. Together, we can win shared prosperity in our region.

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The time for action is now. Learn more about how you can help us shape an equitable Bay Area.

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